20–22 OCTOBER 2020

20–22 OCTOBER 2020

SAAO 200 CONVERTS TO VIRTUAL

Going Beyond the Traditional Symposium to Celebrate Beyond 200 Years of Astronomy

The South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) has been closely monitoring the progression of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, and due to the uncertainty it continues to cause, we have decided to convert our 2020 Symposium to virtual. But even though current events have proscribed the traditional in-person gathering, we can still connect with each other in the virtual environment to mark the milestone of SAAO’s 200th anniversary.

We’re proud to announce this first for SAAO. The Virtual Symposium will be a fully virtual, interactive experience, livestreamed from Tuesday, 20 October through Thursday, 22 October. Abstracts and posters will still be available to view beforehand, and a benefit of the virtual platform is that content can remain available on-demand afterward.

REGISTER NOW
CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

SAAO 200 CONVERTS TO VIRTUAL

Going Beyond the Traditional Symposium to Celebrate Beyond 200 Years of Astronomy

The South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) has been closely monitoring the progression of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, and due to the uncertainty it continues to cause, we have decided to convert our 2020 Symposium to virtual. But even though current events have proscribed the traditional in-person gathering, we can still connect with each other in the virtual environment to mark the milestone of SAAO’s 200th anniversary.

We’re proud to announce this first for SAAO. The Virtual Symposium will be a fully virtual, interactive experience, livestreamed from Tuesday, 20 October through Thursday, 22 October. Abstracts and posters will still be available to view beforehand, and a benefit of the virtual platform is that content can remain available on-demand afterward.

REGISTER NOW
CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

SAAO 200 CONVERTS TO VIRTUAL

Going Beyond the Traditional Symposium to Celebrate Beyond 200 Years of Astronomy

The South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) has been closely monitoring the progression of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa, and due to the uncertainty it continues to cause, we have decided to convert our 2020 Symposium to virtual. But even though current events have proscribed the traditional in-person gathering, we can still connect with each other in the virtual environment to mark the milestone of SAAO’s 200th anniversary.

We’re proud to announce this first for SAAO. The Virtual Symposium will be a fully virtual, interactive experience, livestreamed from Tuesday, 20 October through Thursday, 22 October. Abstracts and posters will still be available to view beforehand, and a benefit of the virtual platform is that content can remain available on-demand afterward.

REGISTER NOW
CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

ABOUT US

Africa has a long and rich relationship with astronomy, dating back millennia with the unique geographical importance of Africa in global astronomy being recognised almost two centuries ago with the establishment of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope on the 20th of October 1820. The observatory is known for the rich history it holds in the contributions in science as well as for its architecture

It now forms part of the current South African Astronomical Observatory, a national facility of the National Research Foundation and the national centre for optical and infrared astronomy in South Africa.

The Cape Town Observatory was formally declared a National Heritage Site by the South African Heritage and Resource Agency (SAHRA) in December 2018. This is a very exciting development for the SAAO, recognising the incredible achievements and their significance over the past two centuries, and ensuring this heritage is preserved.

Moreover, the beginning of the 21st century has seen a renewal of Africa’s strong heritage of astronomical excellence. South Africa is now home to the largest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere (SALT) and the largest and most powerful radio telescope in the southern hemisphere (MeerKAT) and will host a large part of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Project.

ABOUT US

Africa has a long and rich relationship with astronomy, dating back millennia with the unique geographical importance of Africa in global astronomy being recognised almost two centuries ago with the establishment of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope on the 20th of October 1820. The observatory is known for the rich history it holds in the contributions in science as well as for its architecture

It now forms part of the current South African Astronomical Observatory, a national facility of the National Research Foundation and the national centre for optical and infrared astronomy in South Africa.

The Cape Town Observatory was formally declared a National Heritage Site by the South African Heritage and Resource Agency (SAHRA) in December 2018. This is a very exciting development for the SAAO, recognising the incredible achievements and their significance over the past two centuries, and ensuring this heritage is preserved.

Moreover, the beginning of the 21st century has seen a renewal of Africa’s strong heritage of astronomical excellence. South Africa is now home to the largest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere (SALT) and the largest and most powerful radio telescope in the southern hemisphere (MeerKAT) and will host a large part of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Project.

ABOUT US

Africa has a long and rich relationship with astronomy, dating back millennia with the unique geographical importance of Africa in global astronomy being recognised almost two centuries ago with the establishment of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope on the 20th of October 1820. The observatory is known for the rich history it holds in the contributions in science as well as for its architecture

It now forms part of the current South African Astronomical Observatory, a national facility of the National Research Foundation and the national centre for optical and infrared astronomy in South Africa.

The Cape Town Observatory was formally declared a National Heritage Site by the South African Heritage and Resource Agency (SAHRA) in December 2018. This is a very exciting development for the SAAO, recognising the incredible achievements and their significance over the past two centuries, and ensuring this heritage is preserved.

Moreover, the beginning of the 21st century has seen a renewal of Africa’s strong heritage of astronomical excellence. South Africa is now home to the largest optical telescope in the southern hemisphere (SALT) and the largest and most powerful radio telescope in the southern hemisphere (MeerKAT) and will host a large part of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Project.